FitnessFAQs.tv https://fitnessfaqs.tv Bodyweight Strength Training Thu, 26 Jul 2018 07:37:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://fitnessfaqs.tv/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/cropped-single_logo_black7-32x32.png FitnessFAQs.tv https://fitnessfaqs.tv 32 32 My Top 5 Most Popular Videos of 2017 https://fitnessfaqs.tv/most-popular-videos-2017/ https://fitnessfaqs.tv/most-popular-videos-2017/#respond Thu, 28 Dec 2017 04:18:57 +0000 https://fitnessfaqs.tv/?p=3295 This year has been an incredibly busy year for FitnessFAQs. After beginning the year with three full-day workshops across Australia, we worked tirelessly to bring you the Limitless Legs training program – released in August. The FitnessFAQs.tv website was re-launched on new VPS hosting, a brand new design and now features over 20 original blog posts. Full customer testimonials and access to our collection of training products are now easily accessible. We’ve continued to release high quality videos on the FitnessFAQs YouTube channel, which has grown from 272K subscribers in January to 424K. An increase of +155%. Our Instagram has also experienced

The post My Top 5 Most Popular Videos of 2017 appeared first on FitnessFAQs.tv.

]]>
This year has been an incredibly busy year for FitnessFAQs. After beginning the year with three full-day workshops across Australia, we worked tirelessly to bring you the Limitless Legs training program – released in August.

The FitnessFAQs.tv website was re-launched on new VPS hosting, a brand new design and now features over 20 original blog posts. Full customer testimonials and access to our collection of training products are now easily accessible.

We’ve continued to release high quality videos on the FitnessFAQs YouTube channel, which has grown from 272K subscribers in January to 424K. An increase of +155%.

Our Instagram has also experienced a surge in engagement, with the number of followers organically growing from 38K to 84K. An increase of +221%.

Now, in case you’ve missed them – here are the top 5 FitnessFAQs YouTube videos for 2017.

 

#5: Advice every teen should know (13:34)

Are you a teenager or young adult beginning your training journey? If so, you don’t want to miss this. Watch early workout footage of Daniel at 16-17 years old, learn about how teens can build muscle, and our recommendation for how to structure your nutrition.

For non-teens, gain an insight into the mind of FitnessFAQs who has consistently worked at his craft for nearly 9 years.

 

#4: Bulletproof Your Shoulders (6:39)

Shoulder injuries sustained while training are among the most common, and can take a long time to fully recover.

Learn four exercises that can be performed 2-3 times a week to improve the strength and stability of your scapulae and rotator cuffs. Including these into your training program will reduce the risk of injury, allowing you to keep making those sought-after gains.

 

 

#3: Reverse Hyper Alternative (7:33)

If you’re working towards advanced bodyweight skills such as a front lever, back lever or planche, you’ll need the requisite lower body strength to get there.

Learn how this alternative to the reverse hyper exercise can benefit your hip extension strength, as well as your hamstrings and glutes. Regardless of your strength level, an exercise variation in this video will be invaluable for your lower body.

 

 

#2: The 10 Most Common Pullup Mistakes (6:17)

Are you more fearful of doing something incorrectly than learning how to do it correctly? Don’t worry, you’re not alone. Learn the most common mistakes you’ll see nearly everyone making when it comes to one of the most fundamental bodyweight exercises – the pullup.

 

 

#1: Touch Your Toes (Flexibility Hack) (6:45)

With over 1.3M views and 750 comments, this tutorial on how to touch your toes is the most popular FitnessFAQs video for 2017. Learn what is preventing you from being able to touch your toes, how to fix it and discover flexibility you never thought you had.

 

Stay tuned…

Thanks for everyone’s support over the last year. We have an exciting project we’re working on that we can’t wait to share with everyone in 2018. This project will not only take FitnessFAQs to the next level, but also get everyone closer to achieving their bodyweight and calisthenics training goals.

The post My Top 5 Most Popular Videos of 2017 appeared first on FitnessFAQs.tv.

]]>
https://fitnessfaqs.tv/most-popular-videos-2017/feed/ 0
The First 2 Hours of Your Morning https://fitnessfaqs.tv/morning-routine/ https://fitnessfaqs.tv/morning-routine/#comments Wed, 27 Dec 2017 03:57:28 +0000 https://fitnessfaqs.tv/?p=3246 The fate of your day rests on how you spend the first two hours of your morning. We pride ourselves on being able to work hard, sacrifice when needed and “life hack” our way into a productive existence. We embark on ventures such as starting a business, losing weight (to sculpt that elusive dream body) or even learning a new skill to add to our repertoire. Poorly setting up your morning will inhibit the effective realizations of the above objectives. Does the following scenario sound like you?   Common Example The sound of an alarm rings, it’s 7.00am. You reflexively bash the snooze button. The previous

The post The First 2 Hours of Your Morning appeared first on FitnessFAQs.tv.

]]>
The fate of your day rests on how you spend the first two hours of your morning.

We pride ourselves on being able to work hard, sacrifice when needed and “life hack” our way into a productive existence. We embark on ventures such as starting a business, losing weight (to sculpt that elusive dream body) or even learning a new skill to add to our repertoire.

Poorly setting up your morning will inhibit the effective realizations of the above objectives.

Does the following scenario sound like you?

 

Common Example

The sound of an alarm rings, it’s 7.00am.

You reflexively bash the snooze button. The previous night was spent watching that captivating new TV series you’ve been streaming on Netflix while browsing news websites online, destroying the self-made promise of increasing your sleeping hours.

Just 5 more minutes.

The alarm rings again, it’s 7.15am. Snooze.

By the time you rise from your bed, bleary eyed and irritated – it’s 7.45am and you’re met with a familiar feeling of anxiety that you’ve overslept and will be running late for work. You begin sifting through a pile of clothes, the indecision when choosing your daily attire begins to test your patience. Once you’ve arrived at a decision, you dress yourself and dash to the kitchen.

You look at the clock and decide there isn’t enough time to prepare a quick meal; the same conclusion you arrived at the night before when you were about to go to sleep.

By the time you get to work at 9am, you’re hungry.

Not to worry, there are plenty of places to eat near the office! You buy your usual coffee and decide to grab something quick to eat – a muffin because it looks the most appealing. Your hunger is now satisfied. You arrive at your desk, flustered because you haven’t planned your day and begin to have trouble focusing on your work.

 

Actionable ideas for your morning

I’m not going to present to you another cookie cutter “best morning routine” nor anything you absolutely must be doing. There are enough blogs, podcasts and nutritional preachers who have reaped significant rewards from beating this topic into the ground.

What I will do is invite you to review the first two hours of your morning and how it’s spent, as this may be something you have not paid much attention to in the past.

In my attempt to aid you, I’ve listed some common approaches you can experiment with. I’ve also listed some resources for you to get started at the end of each section.

 

1) Reduction in morning decisions

How much time do you spend planning what to eat in the morning? How about what to wear? Completing these tasks the night before will minimise the cognitive fatigue you’ll experience.

On a typical evening, I’ll set everything out for the next morning so I can simply grab what I need and begin my day. This includes preparing tomorrow’s meal, choosing what I’m going to wear and packing my gym bag.

Resources to get started:

  • No resources required – just get it done.

 

2) Morning meal

What does your first meal of the day look like? Is it one that you’ve chosen to ignore due to poor time management or do you practice fasting? If you feel that energy is lacking, particularly during the first hour or two of work, addressing this area should be one of your priorities before you leave in the morning.

According to a study undertaken by NPD group in 2011, 31 million U.S consumers opted against a morning breakfast. This equated to roughly 1 in 10, with 28% of men aged between 18-34 choosing to forgo this morning meal. This illustrates that breakfast isn’t for everyone. Or we’re lazy.

Personally, I love a big meal before I begin working. However, I acknowledge that we’re not all like this.

A few years ago, I traveled overseas with a friend who can’t stand the sight of food until well after 10.30am. His patience was tested as I dragged him around the streets of Tokyo looking for somewhere that served a substantial meal in the early hours of the morning.

 

Oatmeal breakfast

Aesthetically pleasing photo of oatmeal aimed at enticing you.

 

Resources to get started:

    • High protein / fiber breakfast ideas (Eggs, yogurt, oatmeal, cottage cheese). I’ve eaten oatmeal most mornings for over four years. Considered a complex carbohydrate source containing starch and fiber, the slower digestion of this food continues supplying your body with glucose (“energy”) over a longer period.

 

    • Intermittent fasting – If fasting is more your style, here are some approaches you can adopt. I’d recommend the “Leangains” approach. This involves 14-16hrs of fasting with 8-10hrs of eating, closely resembling what would generally be considered a “typical” diet anyway. This is beneficial for weight loss and reducing unnecessary consumption during fasting windows.

 

    • Preparation of smoothies. If you don’t want to fast and would prefer not to eat, prepare a smoothie. Bodybuilding.com has over 150 available recipes for you to experiment with.

 

 

 

3) Morning workout

Too tired after long working hours to train? Get it done first thing in the morning before the onslaught of social media notifications begin pouring into your smartphone.

By training between the hours of 5am-7am, it’s unlikely that you’ll be disturbed. You will not carry a heavy mind burdened by the troubles of the day – you’ll be instead entering into a session with a clean mental slate, theoretically devoid of any fatigue.

Warning: the morning workout isn’t for everyone. You’ll be more likely to succeed if your gym is close to where you live, or if a home gym is an investment you’re willing to make.

Resources to get started:

    • Pact (iPhone / Android) – Put your own cash up as an incentive to cultivate an exercise habit.

 

    • Sleepytime (iPhone / Android) – Calculate the best time to sleep/wake up, helpful when getting started with morning workouts.

 

4) Morning meditation

In case you haven’t realized, the practice of meditation has gained more mainstream exposure online due to its associated benefits. Is it the life-rejuvenating magic pill that you’ve been looking for? Well, there’s only one way to find out.

A common recommendation is meditating for 20 minutes, once a day, in a quiet spot. In my limited experience, I’ve found that sitting on a pillow in a semi-dark room in complete silence works well. I’ve had luck sustaining this practice by limiting it to 10 minutes, every second day and have noticed a negligible improvement, but nothing life defining.

Ideally, the result of meditation will help you be present in the moment, hone in your focus on a task and generally feel more at ease. Everyone’s experience differs, and there is no “best” way to do it. If someone claims otherwise, they’re probably after your money.

See how you go.

Resources to get started:

    • Headspace (iPhone/Android) – Free 10 minute guided meditation sessions to get you started.

 

    • Noisli.com – Ambient sounds such as rain forests, oceans or wind. Very helpful for concentration when working during the day as well.

 

    • Sensory deprivation tanks – I’ve experienced these tanks a handful of times and would recommend it. From my experience, it’s like having a psychedelic experience without the psychedelics. No sound, no light, just you and your thoughts.

 

 

By employing one or more of the above suggestions, your morning will become something you grow to embrace rather than agonizingly endure. Good luck.

The post The First 2 Hours of Your Morning appeared first on FitnessFAQs.tv.

]]>
https://fitnessfaqs.tv/morning-routine/feed/ 3
3 Steps to a Successful YouTube Channel https://fitnessfaqs.tv/3-steps-successful-youtube-channel/ https://fitnessfaqs.tv/3-steps-successful-youtube-channel/#comments Tue, 24 Oct 2017 08:39:31 +0000 https://fitnessfaqs.tv/?p=3132 This article will explain the fundamentals for growing your social media and YouTube presence. Before we begin, let me summarise my story and why you should listen to what I have to say.   The rise of FitnessFAQs on YouTube   I’ve been posting online since 2009. Looking back eight years ago, online content was much different to what we’re used to now. Especially with YouTube and video. I started with uploading training clips to track my progress over time. Up until that point, I had a bad habit of losing files and being lazy with hard drive backups. This meant that

The post 3 Steps to a Successful YouTube Channel appeared first on FitnessFAQs.tv.

]]>
This article will explain the fundamentals for growing your social media and YouTube presence. Before we begin, let me summarise my story and why you should listen to what I have to say.

 

The rise of FitnessFAQs on YouTube

 
I’ve been posting online since 2009. Looking back eight years ago, online content was much different to what we’re used to now. Especially with YouTube and video.
I started with uploading training clips to track my progress over time. Up until that point, I had a bad habit of losing files and being lazy with hard drive backups. This meant that uploading online was an efficient and permanent solution.
 
As of publication, my YouTube channel FitnessFAQs has 44 million views and 400k subscribers. My channel has stood the test of time and has continued to progress over the past few years.

 

fitnessfaqs youtube

FitnessFAQs YouTube – July ’11 to July ’17

 

What started as documenting my training evolved into something greater. To begin with, I was able to leverage my audience to promote my online coaching services. This is something I’m incredibly passionate about, as I love working with others all around the world to reach their bodyweight training goals.

Once I was confident coaching others online, I directed my attention to creating bodyweight training programs. This required consistent study on my part, with the burning question “how can I create my programs to produce the maximum amount of results in the least amount of time?” always at the forefront of my mind.

From this, my Bodyweight EvolutionBody By Rings, and Limitless Legs training programs were created.

Therefore, I’m confident that I have a sound understanding of what works and doesn’t with online media and fitness products.
 
The million dollar question is this – How do you stand out from the crowd and grow your audience? I will now cover a few important principles I’ve observed among content creators with large followings.
jeff seid and daniel vadnal
Jeff Seid vs Daniel Vadnal

 

1) Choose the style of content that suits YOU

The way I see it, content generally falls into two main categories: Educational / Entertaining.
 
What has worked well for me has been educational content. I enjoy producing this style of material as it stands the test of time. People will always be interested in topics such as “How to touch your toes”, “Muscle up tutorial” and “How to improve posture”. Educational content is difficult to produce due to the vast knowledge and research required.
 
In short, most people are not willing to dedicate the time and effort needed. If you’re willing to learn about a topic and produce how to style videos, I guarantee it will generate a viewer base. Unfortunately, not everyone will be passionate about making educational videos for others.
 
If you are gifted with a great sense of humour, I urge you to produce entertaining videos. This style is great because people resonate with what they see and are likely to share among their friends.

 

Funny videos are more likely to go viral than educational videos.

 

It doesn’t matter where you’re from or what language you speak, everyone loves being entertained. For example, consider my “Plyometric Pullup Fail” video which featured extensively on social media.

 

2) Production quality is very important

In 2017, access to HD video is freely available on phone cameras. As such, content can be created and instantly shared online to large audiences.
This is incredibly beneficial for sharing your thoughts and ideas with others, with the added benefit of generating an online income stream further down the track.
 
Unfortunately, social media has become bombarded with constant poor quality, “quick” content. If you want to stand out from the pack, you must embrace the “quality over quantity” mentality.
 
Invest time in learning the basics of photography and videography by watching tutorials on YouTube. This will allow you to maximise your presentation, even if you don’t have expensive equipment.
 
Anyone can produce excellent videos with a modern smartphone or cheap video camera.

 

Pay close attention to location, framing and the message you’re conveying. Your content must be valuable, which will dictate how well your target audience embraces what you’ve created.
 
Once you learn the what, how and the why of filming you can then invest in higher quality camera and audio equipment to enhance the viewer experience. This is not a field which can be understood overnight. However, if you commit to ongoing progression in this area you will quickly pass by those who are content with sub-par presentation.

FitnessFAQs Go Pro             My most popular video 25 Best Pushups (>5m views) was filmed on a GoPro! 

3) Be consistent

The biggest mistake I see YouTubers make is a lack of consistency.

It’s human nature to be motivated in the short-term and adopt an all or nothing mindset. People start out and upload multiple times per week for a few weeks and get burned out. Select an upload frequency which is sustainable and practical for your circumstances and stick with it.

I’ve experienced tremendous channel growth by posting one high quality video per week.

I believe quality truly does outweigh quantity when it comes to online content. Firstly, people will enthusiastically await your next upload. Secondly, it allows ample time to research, film, edit and schedule your content. This way, when life gets busy, there will still be a video ready to go. Don’t let your audience down!

In closing, it’s going to take a lot of time, effort and patience to develop a following online. However, the rewards are life changing.

If you’ve had success developing an online following, let me know in the comments how you’ve achieved it. If you’re just starting out, what are your plans to grow your online presence? 

The post 3 Steps to a Successful YouTube Channel appeared first on FitnessFAQs.tv.

]]>
https://fitnessfaqs.tv/3-steps-successful-youtube-channel/feed/ 5
How to Fix Shoulder Pain for Bodyweight Strength Athletes https://fitnessfaqs.tv/fix-shoulder-pain-bodyweight-strength-athletes/ https://fitnessfaqs.tv/fix-shoulder-pain-bodyweight-strength-athletes/#respond Mon, 29 May 2017 06:16:04 +0000 https://fitnessfaqs.tv/?p=2469 If you are a serious calisthenics athlete, it’s possible you’ve experienced one (or all) of the following:   Pain in the front of your shoulder (during muscle-ups, dips, pushups, etc) Pain when your arms are overhead (during pullups, handstand pushups, etc)   What is causing your pain could be a variety of things. Shoulder impingement, rotator cuff tendonitis and bursitis are common in the physical culture community. Whatever the name – they can all stop your training dead in its tracks. If not treated, they can also turn into chronic issues. Fortunately, there are exercises you can do at home

The post How to Fix Shoulder Pain for Bodyweight Strength Athletes appeared first on FitnessFAQs.tv.

]]>
If you are a serious calisthenics athlete, it’s possible you’ve experienced one (or all) of the following:

 

  • Pain in the front of your shoulder (during muscle-ups, dips, pushups, etc)
  • Pain when your arms are overhead (during pullups, handstand pushups, etc)

 

What is causing your pain could be a variety of things. Shoulder impingement, rotator cuff tendonitis and bursitis are common in the physical culture community.

Whatever the name – they can all stop your training dead in its tracks.

If not treated, they can also turn into chronic issues. Fortunately, there are exercises you can do at home or in the gym that help all of those conditions.

But let’s dig deeper…

Why did you get shoulder pain in the first place? Why are your shoulders so easy to re-injure?

During the extreme ranges of motion and strength level required in calisthenics training – things can go wrong (especially if you are lacking full range of motion.) In simple terms, you end up ramming your soft tissues against your hard tissues and pissing everything off.

Once this happens, shoulders are notoriously prone to re-injury. One basic reason is that there is not a lot of space in certain parts of the shoulder.

For example, subacromial impingement occurs when the subacromial space is narrowed and the soft tissues gets compressed, injured and inflamed.

Due to this lack of space + the swelling that occurs – once inflamed, the shoulder easily becomes re-inflamed.

If you’ve had this happen, you are frustratingly familiar with this vicious cycle of re-injury.

When this condition lingers further it can progress to even more damage to the tissue (tendonosis).

So, it’s essential to address the root causes if you want to fix the issue for good.

 

What are the Root Causes of Shoulder Problems?

 

Pain is a complex topic so it’s impossible to give the one answer. It can be biomechanical (anatomical, structural, postural, movement related) or even lifestyle / nutrition / recovery related.

shoulder pain

 

All of these are factors:

 

  • Bone morphology (genetics)
  • Mobility (combination of genetics + training)
  • Posture habits (lifestyle)
  • Sleep habits (lifestyle)
  • Sitting habits (lifestyle)
  • Poor nutrition (lifestyle)
  • What’s going on in your head (psychology)

 

However, most often in the bodyweight training community it is a mobility / flexibility problem.

If you are a follower of FitnessFAQs, we will assume you know proper technique and know some good basic shoulder strengthening exercises (band pull-aparts, etc). So, we are going to focus on the mobility issues.

 

What Causes Bad Shoulder Mobility?

 

As with pain, there is no single cause of bad shoulder mobility. Typically, it is a combination of posture, anatomy, soft tissue quality and range of motion (ROM).

Specifically:

 

  • Acromion process morphology (shape) which can be Type 1, 2 or 3 (bone shape)
  • Glenohumeral / scapula position and motor control during movement (technique)
  • Thoracic spine posture (posture)
  • Density or shortness in the pecs, delts, lats or other structures of the shoulder (muscles)
  • Neck musculature tightness (especially scalenes) and first rib motion (muscles)

 

Sounds pretty complicated, huh? Well…sorta.

In laymen’s terms – your posture sucks and your muscles are too dense or tight.

 

How does a joint designed to be super mobile become the opposite of mobile?

 

Looking around at the world we live in, sitting for 8+ hours a day since childhood (grade school, middle school, high school, college, work, driving, television, etc)…how could we not have tight, injury prone shoulders?

Most people have been slowly losing shoulder range of motion at an insidiously slow pace since childhood. Its usually in your 20’s, 30’s or 40’s when the sleeping volcano that is your lack of range of motion in your thoracic, glenohumeral and scapula region rears its ugly head!

Good news is you can reverse this trend! Often dramatically if you learn the right approach.

I did it, many of my athletes have done it, and so can you.

The video at the top of this article includes my favorite exercises for beginning your journey. This is not an exhaustive list, but it is a really good place to start.

 

But Wait… What If You Have Tight Shoulders But No Pain?

tight shoulders

If you know you have tight shoulders but don’t experience shoulder pain – congratulations! However, before you start celebrating, be aware that your body may be compensating.

Your limited range of motion has not yet caused an injury – but is it doing damage to other areas of the body?

One comical example of this is when my big, buff athletes (who can barely put their arms overhead) will brag to me about how they’ve never had shoulder pain.

“That’s great!” I say. “How are your elbows and low back doing?” (usually met with a blank stare followed by a gradual “A-Ha!” look of realization)

 

Learning that pain doesn’t always manifest in the area you are tight is a vital lesson for athletes.

 

Think about it…your body’s #1 goal is to keep you moving at all costs.

Imagine being on the great plains of Africa millions of years ago and experiencing a stubbed toe. If your body wasn’t able to adapt (compensate) and use other muscles and movement patterns to hobble around, you would be lion food!

The human body is an amazing compensation machine. It will get the job done and keep you moving…even if it has to slowly sacrifice more and more “other” joints in the process.

As a modern-day calisthenics athlete this means that:

 

  • Your body will sacrifice your elbows to help you swing into your bar muscle ups.
  • You will get a tight, achy back when doing back bridges because your shoulders are too tight.
  • You will get elbow pain in muscle ups or dips

 

The take-home lesson – tight shoulders can lead to injured elbows and backs. Even if you don’t have shoulder pain, try out the exercises in the video above to prevent problems down the road.

 

How to Use This Article/Video to Fix Your Shoulder Pain

 

calisthenics shoulder pain relief2

Always consult with your doctor or medical professional before trying any of these exercises.

The meat-and-potatoes of this article / video are the exercises themselves. Watch the video, pay careful attention to the body positioning and cues, and try all the exercises.

Give these techniques a fair trial for a few weeks and your shoulders will thank you.

Tips to remember:

 

  • The magic is in the tissue work + the stretching + learning to move better.
  • Try all the exercises (even if you’ve tried “something similar” before)
  • Keep working on the tissue until you’ve made noticeable change (less pain, better texture.) Two minutes per area minimum.
  • Stretch for a minimum of 1-2 minutes (two is better if you’re new to stretching)
  • Alternate techniques (breath/relax, contract/relax, etc)
  • Retest your range of motion after each exercise

 

The Ultimate Test of Your Progress

 

back bridge

 

It’s important to get a “before and after” to see how you are improving. To measure your progress we will use two popular calisthenics movements:

 

  • The Back Bridge
  • Dips or Muscle-Ups

 

The ultimate test of your progress is the actual movements you care about. If you prefer to use pullups, pushups, hanging, skin-the-cat or any other movement – go ahead. The important thing is that you test where you are at before, and where you are at after.

What should you be looking for?

Basically, look for two signs of progress: Less pain + more range of motion

 

Try the exercises in the video above 3-4x per week for 30-60 minutes and test your progress with your bridge, dips or muscle-ups over the next 3-4 weeks.

 

In the long-term you will want to develop a body maintenance routine based on these principles. You take care of the human body by massaging it, stretching it, and moving with better posture and technique.

 

In Closing

 

Calisthenics / bodyweight strength training is one of the most rewarding physical activities you can engage in. It is also one of the most demanding activities requiring a high degree of flexibility + strength + motor control.

If you find yourself coming up against a shoulder issue – then step off the gas pedal of training for a short period of time while you focus on regaining some lost mobility.

Remember, the goal is to be a life-long, pain-free athlete. Don’t sacrifice long term health for short term goals.

Related: You’re Not Taking Physical Longevity Seriously Enough

If you find you’ve got a long way to go, just know others have been in the same situation (myself included.)

If one man or woman can do it…so can you.

Be patient, be persistent, be better.

Yours in flexibility,

Shane


Part 1.

 

 

Part 2.


About The Author

 

shanedowd

Shane Dowd, CES, CMP is the owner / founder of GotROM.com. He is also a sports performance & mobility coach specializing in injury prevention and flexibility for athletes.

Want More? FREE Downloads at GotROM.com

gotrom products

FREE GIFTS:
https://www.gotrom.com/p/free-ebook-6-bonus-gifts

SUBSCRIBE ON YOUTUBE:
https://www.youtube.com/c/GotROM

The post How to Fix Shoulder Pain for Bodyweight Strength Athletes appeared first on FitnessFAQs.tv.

]]>
https://fitnessfaqs.tv/fix-shoulder-pain-bodyweight-strength-athletes/feed/ 0
Back Lever Tutorial using Gymnastics Rings https://fitnessfaqs.tv/back-lever-tutorial-gymnastics-rings/ https://fitnessfaqs.tv/back-lever-tutorial-gymnastics-rings/#comments Wed, 03 May 2017 13:58:17 +0000 https://fitnessfaqs.tv/?p=2304 The back lever is a fundamental exercise in the world of gymnastics. By developing this skill on the rings, it opens the door to immense tendon, ligament and body alignment strength. And the best part? It translates to all strength pursuits, not only those exercises used in gymnastics and bodyweight strength training.   The importance of strong tendons and ligaments   Before we step through the back lever progressions, it’s imperative that you understand the role of tendons and ligaments in your body. Unsure of the difference between them? David Robson from Bodybuilding.com makes the following distinction:   They are very similar in

The post Back Lever Tutorial using Gymnastics Rings appeared first on FitnessFAQs.tv.

]]>
The back lever is a fundamental exercise in the world of gymnastics. By developing this skill on the rings, it opens the door to immense tendon, ligament and body alignment strength.

And the best part?

It translates to all strength pursuits, not only those exercises used in gymnastics and bodyweight strength training.

 

The importance of strong tendons and ligaments

 

Before we step through the back lever progressions, it’s imperative that you understand the role of tendons and ligaments in your body.

Unsure of the difference between them? David Robson from Bodybuilding.com makes the following distinction:

 

They are very similar in composition, serve different functions and significantly assist with the process of muscular extension and contraction. Both are designed to passively stabilize joints. A tendon connects the ends of a muscle belly to bone tissue and can be likened to a tough strap-like cord.

When properly developed, a tendon has good elasticity and is strong and capable of great power. Tendons essentially cause the bone to move as they transmit tensile load produced by the muscles.

Ligaments are tougher cord-like fibres with greater flexibility. They tie, or bind, bones together at joints and allow for movement in a specific direction.

 

In short, remember that tendons connect muscle to bone and ligaments connect bone to bone.

To help visualize this, here’s a labelled photo of the human knee:

 

tendon ligament strength

Notice how the tendons are all very close to the bone?

By strengthening your tendons, you’re also building up joint stabilization. This makes weighted/heavy exercises safer to perform, and allows you to progress to more challenging exercises with a lower risk of injury.

A common tendon injury occurs when new users of anabolic steroids quickly gain muscle, with tendon strength lagging behind.

All the newfound quick* muscle can motivate the person to exponentially increase weights, until one or more tendons give out. Using the bicep tendon as an example, a complete rupture will require surgery and can take 6-9 months of recovery to get back to regular strength.

Lastly, stable joints and strong tendons carry over superbly to straight arm strength work. Think of planche work, front lever practice, or… you guessed it, back lever training!

Related: How to fix elbow (tendon) pain from pullups

 

Warming up for the Back Lever

 

Now that we understand the importance of tendon and ligament strength, let’s get started with how we should warm up before our back lever training.

To mitigate the risk of injury, we recommend the following warm-up sequence:

 

1) Shoulder dislocates (15 reps)

  • Can be performed standing or seated, with the latter more technically “strict”. Do your best to avoid lumbar overextension.
  • Too easy? Make it harder by bringing hands closer together, or adding more weight to the movement.
  • Cues: Straight arms, elevate shoulders, retract shoulder blades together, squeeze glutes, chin tucked, chest elevated.

 

Related: Improve Shoulder Mobility FAST (1 Exercise)

 

shoulder warmup dislocates

Weighted shoulder dislocates (floor)

 

2) German hang lower (5 reps)

  • Also known as the “skin the cat” exercise.
  • A dynamic movement using the same range of motion as the back lever.
  • Make sure the rings are set at a comfortable height so you can drop out of the movement if needed.
  • Cues: Lower down slowly, retracted scapulae, squeeze shoulderblades together, chest up, breathe.

 

Related: German Hang Tutorial (Gold Medal Bodies)

 

3) German hang hold (30 seconds)

  • The bottom position of the “German hang lower” warmup exercise.
  • Works well for improving shoulder extension.
  • For the sake of your shoulders, don’t immediately drop down into the bottom position. It will feel uncomfortable, but it should not be painful.
  • Cues: Lower down slowly, retracted scapulae, squeeze shoulder blades together, chest up, breathe.

 

german hang

Ryan Hurst demonstrating a full German hang

 

Back Lever Progressions

 

Now that you’re ready to start your back lever training, you must do your best to stick to the order of progressions below.

As an example, if you can not do an advanced tuck, you will not progress your full back lever by trying (unsuccessfully) to “brute force” the end version.

This is a common mistake we see beginners making in commercial gyms, especially after watching “motivational” calisthenics videos.

 

The difference between them and you is that you will achieve a full back lever, but only if you invest the time, patience and intelligence into the process.

However, if an advanced tuck is too easy for you, it’s not worth your time to keep drilling this same progression level. Increase the difficulty, and make sure you keep challenging yourself.

 

Useful cues for all levels

The following cues for all progressions will make your back lever as strong as it can be. These cues will mean the difference between you progressing safely, and putting yourself at unnecessary risk of injury.

Pay close attention.

 

  1. Scapula protraction: Hollow chest posture and spreading the shoulder blades apart.
  2. Scapula depression: Squeeze hands down towards glutes.
  3. Glute & abdominal engagement.
  4. Lean forward and keep your chest up.

 

For reference, our recommendation is to make sure the rings aren’t more than “shoulder width” apart for all progressions. In the examples below, this roughly worked out to 50 centimeters between the rings.

 

Level 1: Tuck

This is the German hang with your knees brought up to your chest.

tuck back lever fitnessfaqs

 

Level 2: Advanced Tuck

Instead of bringing your knees towards your chest, you’re extending them back towards your bum. Make sure you maintain abdominal tension, an upright chest, and a flat back. No arching.

advanced tuck back lever fitnessfaqs

 

Level 3: “Open”

This level bridges the gap between the advanced tuck being too easy, and the straddle being too difficult. If you’re at this level and have tightness through the hips, we’d advise adding some basic hip stretches to your warm up to avoid unwanted cramping.

advanced tuck back lever open fitnessfaqs

 

Level 4: Straddle

You’re well on your way to achieving a full back lever if you can achieve a comfortable straddle. Glute, abdominal and quad tension is paramount to the success of a satisfactory straddle. Don’t forget to point your toes.

straddle back lever fitnessfaqs

 

Level 5: Half

This level bridges the gap between the straddle being too easy, and the full back lever being too difficult. Same cues as the straddle, except this time your toes should be pointing up to the sky.

half full back lever fitnessfaqs

 

Level 6: Full

You’ve now made it, congratulations. If you’ve learned to develop the requisite body tension throughout your progressions, achieving a full back lever should be no problem for you. However, make sure to film yourself if you’ve reached this stage to check your form.

From experience, you may “feel” that your body is parallel to the ground, but your legs can still be too high. This means you’re lacking the core tension to bring your legs in line with your body, resulting in a banana shape. Don’t do this.

If this is the case, you’re either too fatigued from earlier sets, or you simply need to put in more time with the straddle or “half” variations. 

Quality over quality, gentlemen.

full back lever fitnessfaqs

 

Programming for the Back Lever

 

You now know the importance of tendon and ligament strength, and the necessary progressions to achieve your first back lever. We’ll now explain how you can program it into your own training routine.

Assuming your sleep, diet, and recovery are looked after, we recommend the following:

How many times a week should I be working on this skill? 3 days a week. (2 days static holds, 1 day accessory work mentioned below)

How long should my “holds” be? 3-5 sets of 8-12 seconds at your progression level.

When can I move up a level/progression? When you can hold 5-12 seconds on a progression easily over 3-5 sets.

 

Accessory: Back lever lifts

Lastly, we’ll add that we use the “lift” as an accessory to our static holds. This involves lowering down into the progression you’re at, briefly holding the bottom position, then moving up into an inverted hang.

Repeat this for 3 sets of 3-4 repetitions.

For example, if you’re working on the advanced tuck, jump up into an inverted hang, lower yourself down into the advanced tuck, hold it briefly, then bring yourself back into the inverted hang. This will count as a single repetition.

For more information, watch Daniel’s original video from September 2013

Like all gymnastics skills, results take time and will not come immediately. We promise that if you follow the progressions detailed above, you’ll achieve a full back lever before you know it. Good luck!

If you have any questions, leave a comment below and we’ll help you out.

The post Back Lever Tutorial using Gymnastics Rings appeared first on FitnessFAQs.tv.

]]>
https://fitnessfaqs.tv/back-lever-tutorial-gymnastics-rings/feed/ 9